RachelJanea McGinnis
Rachel Janea McGinnis

John Clay Dickinson & Rachel McGinnis of Palm Beach Celebrate Florida Scuba Diver’s One-Year Anniversary

John Clay Dickinson and Rachel Janea McGinnis are recognized throughout North Palm Beach as some of the area’s most knowledgeable marine conservationists and skilled scuba divers. The pair co-owns Florida Scuba Divers, a one-stop-shop for all things scuba. Last month, the shop celebrated its official one year anniversary.Rachel Janea McGinnis and John Clay Dickinson

Following a 20-year career in the U.S. Air Force, which he began at age 17, John Clay Dickinson worked for several years in medical recruiting before deciding to pursue his passion for scuba as a full-time professional venture. John Dickinson has owned two dive shops in Palm Beach County.

Florida Scuba Divers carries a broad range of products, from dive suits to gear. John Clay Dickinson and Rachel McGinnis of Palm Beach also offer e-learning and certifications to divers of all levels from beginning to advanced. The shop is an open, warm, and inviting hands-on shop, with hands-on product displays. Each customer is invited to touch and try on everything in the dive shop.

In its first year of business, the couple is proud to have served countless customers and inspired a love of SCUBA in numerous newcomers, in addition to sharing their extensive expertise with fellow seasoned divers. With a dedication to quality products, exceptional education, and stellar customer care, it’s no surprise the shop has earned 139 well-deserved five-star reviews from customers via Google Business Reviews. Florida Scuba Divers caters to every type of customer – young and old. Their oldest student to date is 72 years young and is loving his weekly diving sessions.

There’s no one better in Palm Beach to provide the gear and education needed to explore all the mystery and magic Florida’s waters have to offer. Rachel McGinnis of Palm Beach explains that Florida Scuba Divers has the largest scuba diving mask wall, where no person leaves the store without a perfect fit and the knowledge of how important it is to have a properly fitting mask.

In addition to scuba-ing for several years, Rachel McGinnis and John Dickinson of Palm Beach have organized and participated in various marine conservation and education efforts. This includes removing the invasive lionfish species from Florida shores, for which endeavors the couple has earned several accolades.

John Dickinson of Palm Beach was also featured on Shark Week for his find of a population of sawfish in the North Palm Beach area, and the divers have captured rare footage of nurse sharks mating. They also provide how-to videos for Floridians to assist in lionfish eradication.

John Clay Dickinson and Rachel McGinnis of Palm Beach are looking forward to another year of serving North Palm Beach and sharing the excitement of scuba.

For more information about Florida Scuba Divers, visit the website: https://www.floridascubadivers.com/ or follow them on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/floridascubadivers/ or Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Dive561.270.5788/

Marine Conservationist John Clay Dickinson Recognized by Florida Governor Rick Scott for Lionfish Eradication Efforts

Florida is a massive state with a landscape as diverse as its population. Regardless of whether they’re a snowbird living in Orlando or a surfer in Miami, there are a few things most Floridians can agree upon. Among them are a distaste for humidity, a distrust of alligators, and a disdain for lionfish.

Lionfish are numerous along the coasts of Florida, and while they may look harmless enough with their bright colors and pretty fins, they are actually quite destructive. The species, which is not native to the area, has wreaked such havoc on the local ecosystem as to have garnered attention from state politicians, including Rick Scott. In 2018, Rick Scott recognized the efforts of local marine conservationists, including John Clay Dickinson and Rachel Janea McGinnis, who demonstrated exemplary effort in removing lionfish from the state’s waters.

Then-governor Rick Scott signed a bill (SB 168) in 2018 aimed at reducing the number of lionfish and other invasive species. The bill was unanimously approved by the state Legislature and established a program that allowed the commission to enter contracts with people and organizations to eliminate lionfish from the area.

John Clay Dickinson and Rachel McGinnis of Palm Beach are marine experts and co-owners of Florida Scuba Divers. The pair is well-known for their contribution to lionfish removal efforts throughout the years. While doing good is enough incentive for the conservationists, the signed card of recognition from the former governor was an honor to receive.

John Clay Dickinson explained that the lionfish invasion has been called one of The Atlantic’s most devastating environmental disasters. In the past 30 years, the species has decimated native marine life and wreaked havoc on Florida’s reefs. Native to the Indo-Pacific, the fish were likely brought to the U.S. southeast coast, Caribbean, and parts of the Gulf of Mexico by humans. It is possible that, in part, the issue was caused by people dumping unwanted fish from aquariums into the ocean.

Because they’re not native, lionfish have very few natural predators and have become vastly overpopulated. John Dickinson explained that, like any invasive species with a population of this scale, they’re a serious threat to the native ecosystem, capable of reducing biodiversity, consuming resources previously available for native organisms, and potentially driving native species to extinction. Being carnivorous, they also threaten Florida’s fishing economy as they feed on young commercial fish species such as grouper and snapper.

With the support of the Florida government, local groups, including the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) arrange regular lionfish removal events. Volunteers like John Dickinson of Palm Beach and Rachel Janea McGinnis along with hundreds of others remove the fish from the waters in an effort to conserve the local ecosystem. John Clay Dickinson & Rachel McGinnis has consistently earned recognition year after year for their impressive haul of lionfish during such removal events.

Florida Scuba Divers, in an effort to educate customers about the lionfish problem, keeps a lionfish on the front counter of the shop in an aquarium. Customers can see the species up-close and get a deeper understanding of the delicate balance that is the marine ecosystem. Discussing the problematic invasive species also opens the way for broader discussions about marine conservation and what individuals, families, and communities can do to lend a hand to protect the oceans and seas.

More on Florida Scuba Divers

Florida Scuba Divers is the North Palm Beach’s one-stop-shop for all things SCUBA, with a broad range of products, from dive suits to gear, and offerings of e-learning and certifications for divers of all levels. Within one year in business, John Clay Dickinson and Rachel Janea McGinnis are proud to have served countless customers. The pair have inspired a love of SCUBA in numerous newcomers, in addition to sharing their expertise and enthusiasm with fellow advanced divers. With a dedication to quality, education, and customer service, it’s no wonder the shop has already earned 135 well-earned five-star reviews from customers via Google Business Reviews as of December. This December, the shop will officially celebrate its one-year anniversary.

For more information about Florida Scuba Divers, visit the website: https://www.floridascubadivers.com/ or follow them on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/floridascubadivers/ or Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Dive561.270.5788/

John Clay Dickinson and Rachel McGinnis Give Top Lionfish Removal Tips

Rachel McGinnis of Palm BeachIf you’re a Florida resident, chances are you’ve heard of the lionfish. You may even have seen one in its “natural” habitat. The problem with these striking and whimsically-named sea creatures, however, is that the habitat Mother Nature intended for them is far from the Florida shores, and their displacement has sent shockwaves through the local ecosystem. In fact, the lionfish invasion has been called one of The Atlantic’s most devastating environmental disasters. In the past thirty years, the species has decimated native marine life and wreaked havoc on Florida’s reefs.

John Clay Dickinson and Rachel McGinnis of Palm Beach are marine experts and co-owners of Florida Scuba Divers. The pair is well-known for their contribution to lionfish removal efforts and have even earned recognition from Rick Scott, former Florida governor, for the number of fish they’ve removed from the reef each year.

More than a supplies store, Florida Scuba Divers is a venue through which John Clay Dickinson and Rachel McGinnis educate the public on ways to create a healthier and more harmonious marine environment. This, of course, includes lionfish removal.

John Dickinson of Palm Beach explained that lionfish, native to the Indo-Pacific, were likely brought to the U.S. southeast coast, Caribbean, and parts of the Gulf of Mexico by humans. It is possible that, in part, the issue was caused by people dumping unwanted fish from aquariums into the ocean.

Because they’re not native, lionfish have very few natural predators and have become vastly overpopulated. John Dickinson of Palm Beach explained that, like any invasive species with a population of this scale, they’re a serious threat to the native ecosystem, capable of reducing biodiversity, consuming resources previously available for native organisms, and potentially driving native species to extinction. Being carnivorous, they also threaten Florida’s fishing economy as they feed on young commercial fish species such as grouper and snapper.

Here’s what John Clay Dickson and Rachel McGinnis of Palm Beach say you can do to contribute to the lionfish eradication effort:

-Eat lionfish at local restaurants: An increasing number of restaurants are serving lionfish on the menu as a means of getting these fish out of the water without letting them go to waste. The fish, John Dickinson of Palm Beach said, tastes just like snapper or even better than hogfish, popular Floridian fishing experts. The marine conservationist warns, however, that while the spines are not poisonous they do carry a venom that can be painful if stuck. Protective gloves should be worn while handling these fish.

-Join a community clean-up event: Florida Scuba Divers participates in several clean-up events every year in coordination with other marine conservation organizations. Stop by the shop or visit the website to learn about upcoming events. There are even derbies and tournaments with awards for the most lionfish collected.

-Be a lionfish reporter: The Florida Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) needs to be up to date on where lionfish are spreading and how fast, in addition to how many are successfully being removed. They’ve launched the Report Florida Lionfish app, which you can download and use to share info about lionfish sightings and removals. You can also share information at MyFWC.com/fishing. Interested in participating in a Lionfish Challenge checkpoint? Contact Lionfish@MyFWC.com for more information and instructions. Florida Scuba Divers is a dropoff location for FWC Lionfish Challenges throughout the year.

More on Florida Scuba Divers

Florida Scuba Divers is the North Palm Beach’s one-stop-shop for all things SCUBA, with a broad range of products, from dive suits to gear, and offerings of e-learning and certifications for divers of all levels. Within one year in business, John Clay Dickinson and Rachel McGinnis are proud to have served countless customers. The co-owners have inspired a love of SCUBA in numerous newcomers, in addition to sharing their expertise and enthusiasm with fellow advanced divers. With a dedication to quality, education, and customer service, it’s no wonder the shop has already earned 132 well-earned five-star reviews from customers via Google Business Reviews as of December. This December, the shop celebrates its one-year anniversary.

For more information about Florida Scuba Divers, visit the website: https://www.floridascubadivers.com/ or follow them on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/floridascubadivers/ or Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Dive561.270.5788/

John Clay Dickinson, Co-Owner of Florida Scuba Divers, Announces Shop’s One-Year Anniversary

Florida is one of the United States’ hottest destinations for good reason. Home to the Walt Disney World Resort, the nightlife capital of Miami, a population as diverse as its ecosystem, year-round sunshine, and miles upon miles of shimmering waters and pristine beaches, it’s no wonder the state attracted more than 111 million domestic travelers, 10 million overseas visitors, and 3.5 million Canadian tourists in 2018 alone. It’s also home to 21.3 million residents proud of the state’s unique blend of rich history and culture, modern infrastructure and industry, and stunning natural beauty. It’s the latter that drew John Clay Dickinson and Rachel Janea McGinnis to the Sunshine State. The pair, who have called Florida home for decades now, are the owners of Florida Scuba Divers. Marine professionals with extensive experience in SCUBA and marine exploration and conservation, John Clay Dickinson and Rachel Janea McGinnis are ecstatic to celebrate the shop’s one-year anniversary this December.

Florida Scuba Divers is the area’s one-stop-shop for all things SCUBA. They sell a broad range of products, from dive suits to gear, and offer e-learning and certifications to divers of all levels from beginning to advanced. Within one year in business, John Clay Dickinson and Rachel Janea McGinnis are proud to have served countless customers and inspired a love of SCUBA in numerous newcomers, in addition to sharing their extensive expertise with fellow seasoned divers. With a dedication to quality products, exceptional education, and stellar customer care, the shop has earned 123 well-earned five-star reviews from customers via Google Business Reviews as of November.

John Clay Dickinson, who began his military career at age 17 and retired from the US Air Force after 20 years of service, worked in medical recruiting for several years before dedicating himself and to his true passions: marine exploration and conservation, full-time. He has owned two dive shops in Palm Beach County and was featured on Shark Week for his find of a population of Sawfish in the Northern Palm Beach area. He and partner Rachel Janea McGinnis are looking forward to educating and inspiring more Florida tourists and residents about the ocean and its treasures in the years to come.

For more information about Florida Scuba Divers, visit the website: https://www.floridascubadivers.com/ or follow them on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/floridascubadivers/ or Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Dive561.270.5788/.

SCUBA Specialists, John Clay Dickinson and Rachel Janea McGinnis, Organize Beach Clean-Ups to Preserve the Oceans & Save Marine Species

From Miami to Fort Lauderdale and Venice Beach to Daytona, Florida is world-famous for its spacious sandy beaches and stunning coastline. The state, also home to Disney World and a host of other tourist hot spots, attracts about forty million visitors every year and is home to another 21.3 million. Rachel Janea McGinnis and John Clay Dickinson of Lake Park, FL, have called the state home for decades. Marine biology and aquatic professionals, the pair is dedicated to preserving the area’s natural treasures and diverse ecosystem for future generations of travelers and residents alike. Their efforts include organizing several beach clean-ups, community events at which volunteers spend time removing trash and other harmful waste from area beaches.

Rachel Janea McGinnis and John Clay Dickinson echo the sentiment of scientists, researchers, conservationists, and eco-conscious citizens around the globe when they say a significant change is needed to save the world. Specifically, along with the looming effects of climate change, the affront to our seas and oceans is a serious issue that affects millions of species all along the food chain, from coral reefs to human beings.

America alone generates about 10.5 million tons of plastic waste every year but recycles just one to two percent of it, according to Seastewards. About 14 billion pounds of trash, much of which is plastic, ends up in the ocean, killing as many as one million marine animals and birds in the Pacific Ocean each day, according to the organization.

Rachel Janea McGinnis, co-owner of Florida SCUBA Divers in Southeast Florida, says although a massive change is needed to get our earth and oceans back on track, a little effort can go a long way. With the help of community volunteers throughout Florida and beyond, there is hope for our oceans and the millions of species that call the water and shorelines home.

In addition to participating in beach clean-ups, Rachel Janea McGinnis and John Clay Dickinson encourage everyone to minimize the use of plastic. In particular, they advise, eliminate as many disposable plastics as possible from your daily life, including disposable cutlery, cups, and straws. Also, recycle whenever possible. Not only can you toss items into the recycling bin, but you can also reuse containers, such as cottage cheese and yogurt tubs, for food storage or household organization, rather than throwing them away.

Rachel Janea McGinnis and John Clay Dickinson are hopeful for the future of Florida and are inspired by the legions of volunteers and concerned citizens putting in work to make the world a better place.

To find out more about Florida SCUBA Divers, please visit: http://www.floridascubadivers.com/